Dead Sea from Amman

Dead Sea From Amman
Dead Sea From Amman

Dead Sea Amman Beach

 

Located in the Jordan Valley, part of the Great Rift Valley that runs from East Africa to Turkey, the Dead Sea is the remains of a giant inland lake. Lake Lisan was 200 kilometers long and approximately 200 meters deeper than the current level of the Dead Sea. As it contracted, it left Lake Tiberias and the Dead Sea, which at 408 meters below sea level is the lowest point on earth.

 The salt content of the sea is 20%, eight times the level of the world's oceans. This concentration contributes to the amazing buoyancy of the water and is a legacy of years of evaporation. The only life forms left in the Dead Sea are eleven species of bacteria. The waters are rich in minerals, including calcium, magnesium, bromine, iodine, and bitumen. All these have healing properties that can alleviate or ease allergies, skin rashes, bronchial irritations or glandular conditions. Visitors come from all over the world to ease or cure their conditions at the medical treatment centers at the Dead Sea. Even those suffering only from ennui can enjoy the high-quality spas in the area. In addition, due the unique depth of its location, the climate and quality of sunshine in the Dead Sea area is beneficial. Dead Sea salts and mud are known worldwide for their healthful properties.

 

With us, you can enjoy a memorable dead sea holiday tour. Your full day trip to the Dead Sea starts from Amman (if one to three persons, then in a Modern Sedan vehicle or we use an H1 van for accommodating four to seven).

The full-day trip to the Dead Sea will help you explore the Mount Nebo, Baptism Site, A-Mujib Siq Trail “Summer Time” .

Sunset at Amman Beach.

Its 2km south of the main resort strip, is run by Amman municipality to give affordable access to the Dead Sea. The grounds are attractively landscaped and the beach is clean, with sun umbrellas, freshwater showers and a vibrant local flavour, making it a great place to strike up conversation with a Jordanian family.There are also a number of swimming pools, a restaurant (JD10 buffet), some drinks stalls, basketball courts and an amusement park next door.

History

DENVER — A superheated blast from the skies obliterated cities and farming settlements north of the Dead Sea around 3,700 years ago, preliminary findings suggest.

 Radiocarbon dating and unearthed minerals that instantly crystallized at high temperatures indicate that a massive airburst caused by a meteor that exploded in the atmosphere instantaneously destroyed civilization in a 25-kilometer-wide circular plain called Middle Ghor, said archaeologist Phillip Silvia. The event also pushed a bubbling brine of Dead Sea salts over once-fertile farm land, Silvia and his colleagues suspect.

 People did not return to the region for 600 to 700 years, said Silvia, of Trinity Southwest University in Albuquerque. He reported these findings at the annual meeting of the American Schools of Oriental Research on November 17.

 Excavations at five large Middle Ghor sites, in what’s now Jordan, indicate that all were continuously occupied for at least 2,500 years until a sudden, collective collapse toward the end of the Bronze Age. Ground surveys have located 120 additional, smaller settlements in the region that the researchers suspect were also exposed to extreme, collapse-inducing heat and wind. An estimated 40,000 to 65,000 people inhabited Middle Ghor when the cosmic calamity hit, Silvia said.

 The most comprehensive evidence of destruction caused by a low-altitude meteor explosion comes from the Bronze Age city of Tall el-Hammam, where a team that includes Silvia has been excavating for the last 13 years. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the mud-brick walls of nearly all structures suddenly disappeared around 3,700 years ago, leaving only stone foundations.

 What’s more, the outer layers of many pieces of pottery from same time period show signs of having melted into glass. Zircon crystals in those glassy coats formed within one second at extremely high temperatures, perhaps as hot as the surface of the sun, Silvia said.

 High-force winds created tiny, spherical mineral grains that apparently rained down on Tall el-Hammam, he said. The research team has identified these minuscule bits of rock on pottery fragments at the site.

 Examples exist of exploding space rocks that have wreaked havoc on Earth (SN: 5/13/17, p. 12). An apparent meteor blast over a sparsely populated Siberian region in 1908, known as the Tunguska event, killed no one but flattened 2,000 square kilometers of forest. And a meteor explosion over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in 2013 injured more than 1,600 people, mainly due to broken glass from windows that were blown out.

 You can enjoy and book your tour to the Dead Sea with Jordan Best Tours, as we have multi days tours to the Dead Sea. 

  Source:www.sciencenews.org

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